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International conference on Dementia 2020, will be organized around the theme “ Improving The Quality Of Care For People with Dementia”

Dementia 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Dementia 2020

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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Dementia: Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—and behavioural abilities to such an extent that it interferes with a person's daily life and activities. These functions include memory, language skills, visual perception, problem solving, self-management, and the ability to focus and pay attention. Some people with dementia cannot control their emotions, and their personalities may change. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person's functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for basic activities of living.

Signs and symptoms of dementia result when once-healthy neurons (nerve cells) in the brain stop working, lose connections with other brain cells, and die. While everyone loses some neurons as they age, people with dementia experience far greater loss.While dementia is more common as people grow older (up to half of all people age 85 or older may have some form of dementia), it is not a normal part of aging. Many people live into their 90s and beyond without any signs of dementia. One type of dementia, frontotemporal disorders, is more common in middle-aged than older adults.

 

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<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\r\n Lewy body in Dementia :  Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a disease associated with abnormal deposits of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain. These deposits, called Lewy bodies, affect chemicals in the brain whose changes, in turn, can lead to problems with thinking, movement, behavior, and mood. Lewy body dementia is one of the most common causes of dementia. Diagnosing LBD can be challenging. Early Lewy body dementia symptoms are often confused with similar symptoms found in other brain diseases like Alzheimer's or in psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia. Also, Lewy body dementia can occur alone or along with other brain disorders.

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\r\n Alzheimer Disease :  Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder that causes brain cells to waste away (degenerate) and die. Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia — a continuous decline in thinking, behavioral and social skills that disrupts a person's ability to function independently. The early signs of the disease may be forgetting recent events or conversations. As the disease progresses, a person with Alzheimer's disease will develop severe memory impairment and lose the ability to carry out everyday tasks. Current Alzheimer's disease medications may temporarily improve symptoms or slow the rate of decline. These treatments can sometimes help people with Alzheimer's disease maximize function and maintain independence for a time. Different programs and services can help support people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers.

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Vascular dementia, also known as multi-infarct dementia is the second most common cause of dementia in older people. Because it has a lower profile than Alzheimer's, many people don't suspect vascular dementia when forgetfulness becomes problematic. It's also difficult to diagnose so it's difficult to know exactly how many people suffer from vascular dementia. Current estimates attribute 15% to 20% of dementia cases in older adults to vascular dementia.  Vascular dementia occurs when vessels that supply blood to the brain become blocked or narrowed. Strokes take place when the supply of blood carrying oxygen to the brain is suddenly cut off. However, not all people with stroke will develop vascular dementia. Vascular dementia can occur over time as "silent" strokes pile up. Quite often, vascular dementia draws attention to itself only when the impact of so many strokes adds up to significant disability. Avoiding and controlling risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, smoking, and high cholesterol can help curb the risk of vascular dementia.

 

Traumatic brain injury usually results from a violent blow or jolt to the head or body. An object that penetrates brain tissue, such as a bullet or shattered piece of skull, also can cause traumatic brain injury. Mild traumatic brain injury may affect your brain cells temporarily. More-serious traumatic brain injury can result in bruising, torn tissues, bleeding and other physical damage to the brain. These injuries can result in long-term complications or death. Traumatic brain injury can have wide-ranging physical and psychological effects. Some signs or symptoms may appear immediately after the traumatic event, while others may appear days or weeks later.

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\r\n Physical symptoms

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  • \r\n Loss of consciousness from several minutes to hours
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  • \r\n Persistent headache or headache that worsens
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  • \r\n Repeated vomiting or nausea
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  • \r\n Convulsions or seizures
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  • \r\n Dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes
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  • \r\n Clear fluids draining from the nose or ears
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  • \r\n Inability to awaken from sleep
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  • \r\n Weakness or numbness in fingers and toes
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  • \r\n Loss of coordination
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<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\r\n Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people worldwide. Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases. In 2016, an estimated 5.4 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease. An estimated 930,000 people in the United States could be living with Parkinson’s disease by 2020. Neurodegenerative diseases occur when nerve cells in the brain or peripheral nervous system lose function over time and ultimately die. Although treatments may help relieve some of the physical or mental symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases, there is currently no way to slow disease progression and no known cures.Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people worldwide. Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases. In 2016, an estimated 5.4 million Americans were living with Alzheimer’s disease. An estimated 930,000 people in the United States could be living with Parkinson’s disease by 2020. Neurodegenerative diseases occur when nerve cells in the brain or peripheral nervous system lose function over time and ultimately die. Although treatments may help relieve some of the physical or mental symptoms associated with neurodegenerative diseases, there is currently no way to slow disease progression and no known cures.

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\r\n Not all brain diseases are categorized as mental illnesses. Disorders such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis are brain disorders, but they are considered neurological diseases rather than mental illnesses. Interestingly, the lines between mental illnesses and these other brain or neurological disorders is blurring somewhat. As scientists continue to investigate the brains of people who have mental illnesses, they are learning that mental illness is associated with changes in the brain's structure, chemistry, and function and that mental illness does indeed have a biological basis.

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<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\r\n Losing a loved one, getting fired from a job, going through a divorce, and other difficult situations can lead a person to feel sad, lonely and scared. These feelings are normal reactions to life's stressors. Most people feel low and sad at times. However, in the case of individuals who are diagnosed with depression as a psychiatric disorder, the manifestations of the low mood are much more severe and they tend to persist. Depression occurs more often in women than men. Some differences in the manner in which the depressed mood manifests has been found based on sex and age. In men it manifests often as tiredness, irritability and anger. They may show more reckless behavior and abuse drugs and alcohol. They also tend to not recognize that they are depressed and fail to seek help. In women depression tends to manifest as sadness, worthlessness, and guilt. In younger children depression is more likely to manifest as school refusal, anxiety when separated from parents, and worry about parents dying. Depressed teenagers tend to be irritable, sulky, and get into trouble in school. They also frequently have co-morbid anxiety, eating disorders, or substance abuse. In older adults depression may manifest more subtly as they tend to be less likely to admit to feelings of sadness or grief and medical illnesses which are more common in this population also contributes or causes the depression. 

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\r\n Cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne), and rivastigmine (Exelon) slow the breakdown of a brain chemical involved in memory and judgment.

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<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\r\n Many caregivers are confused by conflicting explanations of dementia. One such aspect is how dementia affects persons. Some reports show persons with dementia as passive persons, unable to do anything; phrases used include “not quite there” or “absent”. This is misleading. Persons with dementia can lead active and fulfilling lives if given suitable support. Some other reports show them as unreasonable, agitated, and violent. But not all persons with dementia show agitation or other worrying behavior. Also, many factors affect behavior and worrisome behavior can be reduced by adjusting things like the environment, activities, and interactions. The Dementia Care Notes site provides information to help families understand dementia and care. We also include relevant links and resources. We hope this will make the dementia care journey smoother and more effective for everyone. Many caregivers are confused by conflicting explanations of dementia. One such aspect is how dementia affects persons. Some reports show persons with dementia as passive persons, unable to do anything; phrases used include “not quite there” or “absent”. This is misleading. Persons with dementia can lead active and fulfilling lives if given suitable support. Some other reports show them as unreasonable, agitated, and violent. But not all persons with dementia show agitation or other worrying behavior. Also, many factors affect behavior and worrisome behavior can be reduced by adjusting things like the environment, activities, and interactions.

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<p style="\&quot;text-align:" justify;\"="">\r\n Research focused on beta-amyloid, however, hasn’t panned out in the way many had hoped. Many of the late-stage drug trials reporting negative results in recent years have been tests of treatments targeting the protein. There’s a silver lining, however: much of the knowledge we have gained about other potential treatments, and how to properly conduct clinical trials in people with and at risk for Alzheimer’s, has been from studies that, by the standard metrics, would be considered failures. Researchers are still trying to understand the role of beta-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease, but are also exploring new potential treatment targets ranging from brain inflammation to the gut microbiome. It’s found that bone marrow stem cells are effective at fighting inflammation—and there is now research underway into whether they could do the same if introduced into the brain. Our understanding of the role of the gut microbiome in Alzheimer’s is in its infancy, but, thanks to the early research focused on beta-amyloid, we now know that lipids and other digestive chemicals wind up in the brain, which means they might be manipulated microbially as a treatment approach.

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